Audiobooks to Listen to while Playing Animal Crossing!

Animal Crossing came out yesterday and I am so so so glad. And I love listening to audiobooks while I play Animal Crossing. There is nothing better than watering your flowers, fishing and bug catching with a gentle story being told in the background. I tend to go for more relaxed audiobooks, nothing too complicated or full of action that might ruin the Animal Crossing ~vibes~ for me. So here are my recommendations, and a few I plan to listen to!



If you have a pig villager, or a hankering for pastoral mischief, look no further than The Blandings Castle series by P.G. Wodehouse. I cannot recommend a series more for listening while playing Animal Crossing because the stakes are very very low and every book follows a similar plotline of someone impersonating someone else and something nefarious to do with the pig. I’ve read eight or nine of these now and they’re always read by very posh older gentlemen in very soothing tones.

If your luck ran out and your island is full of smug and snooty villagers, then I think you can’t go wrong with a Jane Austen. Personally, I think Emma is a great pick if you’re surrounded by gossips, and the new movie is out this year.

If you’re in the Northern Hemisphere and are taken by the Spring vibes and the sound of water, Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome is the story of, you guessed it, three men (and a dog) in a boat taking a holiday down the river Thames. I just listened to this in February and recommend both unabridged and abridged (which is on Spotify, read by Hugh Laurie).

If you feel like leaning into the oddity of being the only humanoid on an island of talking animals, look to further than the Discworld books by Terry Pratchett. I really recommend the witches branch of this series, starting with Equal Rites, but Lianne has a great video breaking down the vast universe and all the best starting points. Oddball characters, magic, fantasy lands, I didn’t really like the first book which I read physically but they shine in audiobook format.

Personally, I just started Lady Susan by Jane Austen but it’s pretty short and two and a half hours is nothing when it comes to Animal Crossing. I’m really tempted to go back and listen to the Sookie Stackhouse books by Charlaine Harris on audiobook as I’ve been slowly re-reading them since I finished my first read of my favourite waitresses tales.

If you are looking to load up on audiobooks, consider Libro.fm as they’re currently doing a deal where you get two books for the price of one and all the money goes to your local bookstore! Or you can get a free book using my link. Libro is a great alternative to Audible!

And what will I be listening to?
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My Februwitchy TBR!

My wonderful friend Asha is hosting a month-long readathon; Februwitchy (you can read all about it here) and I, of course, needed to join. Mainly because I love witches but also because I bought a lot of witchy books for my Hallowreadathon, which Asha helped host, and never got around to reading them! I don’t normally do TBRs because I’m a huge mood reader but I think I’ve covered all my bases with this one…

If I feel like romance; The Witches of Cambridge by Menna Van Praag and Practical Magic by Alice Hoffman both blend magic with love. I’ve wanted to read more romance lately and I think these will help me dip my feet in with a familiar urban fantasy feel.

Both The Witch’s Daughter by Paula Brackston and The Secret History of Witches by Louisa Morgan are a blend of historical fiction and romance ending up in modern day (from what I can gather from blurbs) and if you search for witch-y books, I guarantee any list will include both of these so I want to get into at least one of these chunks.

If I feel like a historical fiction book that is more on the side of history, Her Kind by Niamh Boyce* is about the 14th century Kilkenny witch trials in Ireland. I don’t think I’ve read much of this time period before so I’m looking forward to learning more about it.

Hex Life, edited by Christopher Golden and Rachel Autumn Deering was a Secret Santa gift from Kate and I think it’s going to be the star of this readathon for me because if I can just read one of the eighteen stories every day, then I’ll finish this in no time. I love discovering new authors as well so this might end up making my TBR longer…

And if I feel like YA, I’ve got How to Hang a Witch by Adriana Mather, a birthday present from the wonderful Mols. Naondel and Maresi: Red Mantle by Maria Turtshaninoff which have been intimidating me ever since I read the first incredible book in this series, so I need the readathon themed push! And Perfectly Preventable Deaths by Deirdre Sullivan was a book I bought last year because I was seeing Maria and Deirdre at the Edinburgh Book Festival but never dived into it. For shame!

What are you reading in February? Anything witch-y?
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Books I Want to Buy and Why #16: 2020 Releases!

It’s my birthday today! And since it’s the 20th, why not talk about the 2020 releases that I’m treating myself to as a birthday gift? I love a good number pattern, I wish there were 20 books but I only have eight…

A Longer Fall by Charlaine Harris
Internationally bestselling Charlaine Harris is at her best here, building a compelling world of this alternate history of the United States, where magic is an acknowledged but despised power.

I didn’t really enjoy the first book in this series when I read it but I love Charlaine Harris’s writing style and honestly, I can’t stop thinking about An Easy Death so maybe A Longer Fall will surprise me!
14th January

Tender is the Flesh by Agustina Bazterrica
It all happened so quickly. First, animals became infected with the virus and their meat became poisonous. Then, governments initiated the Transition. Now, ‘special meat’ – human meat – is legal.

One of my most common arguments I have with a friend of mine is whether or not human meat, given freely in the zombie apocalypse, would be vegan. So, even though it doesn’t sound like this meat is being given voluntarily,  I’m really looking forward to this. I wonder what happened to all the plant-protein like lentils and beans…
6th February

A Witch in Time by Constance Sayers
A young witch is cursed to relive a doomed love affair through many lifetimes, as both troubled muse and frustrated artist, in this haunting debut novel.
Witches have been my jam for a while now and this one is a time-travel romance set in 19th Century France, 30’s Hollywood, 70’s LA and present-day Washington! I’ve never found a time-travel novel that’s worked for me but I have high hopes for this one.
11th February

My Dark Vanessa by Kate Elizabeth Russell
An era-defining novel about the relationship between a fifteen-year-old girl and her teacher. 

All he did was fall in love with me and the world turned him into a monster.
I don’t tend to read many issue books as I can find them a bit stressful, but I found Lolita by Vladamir Nabokov fascinating, and this is dealing with a similar topic from the victim’s perspective. I think it’s a must-read debut.
31st March

Would Like to Meet by Rachel Winters
Long-suffering assistant Evie Summers will lose her job unless she can convince her film agency’s biggest and most difficult client, Ezra Chester, to finish the script for a Hollywood romcom. The catch? He hasn’t started writing it.I heard about this one from V.V. James’ Instagram post, yeah, V.V. James who wrote one of my favourite books of last year. She described it as a rom-com with Nora Ephron energy… Sign me up!
30th April 

Six Tudor Queens: Katheryn Howard, The Tainted Queen by Alison Weir

Acclaimed, bestselling historian Alison Weir draws on extensive research to recount one of the most tragic tales in English history – that of a lively, sweet but neglected girl, used by powerful men for their own gain.
I’ve been reading this series since 2016 and although I have a proof, I’m definitely going to buy the hardcover. I have for the past four books and I’m really enjoying this so far! Look for a review in the future.

14th May

The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins
The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes will revisit the world of Panem sixty-four years before the events of The Hunger Games, starting on the morning of the reaping of the Tenth Hunger Games.
Way back when I first started talking about books on this blog, I read The Hunger Games trilogy, and boy, those old reviews are rough. But they were the first books after years of not enjoying reading that I really loved and I’m so excited to see more of the world.
19th May

Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas
A trans boy determined to prove his gender to his conservative Latinx family summons a ghost who refuses to leave in Aiden Thomas’s paranormal YA debut Cemetery Boys. 

This has a trans main character, a gay romance, and ghosts. That could literally be a list of things I want to read more of in 2020, so June has never seemed to far away!
9th June

What books are you looking forward to in 2020? Don’t forget to enter my giveaway to win a pre-order!
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My Hallowreadathon TBR!

The nights darken, the sweets are ready for the trick-or-treaters and the sixth Hallowreadathon approaches. So I’ve piled up truly too many books that fit the challenges so I have lots to choose from! Hopefully if you’re taking part, this might give you a few last minute ideas. Don’t forget to follow the official Twitter and use the #Hallowreadathon to be in with a chance of winning a spooky care package!

1. Read a book with witches!

This challenge was inspired by the amount of amazing witch books on my TBR and I absolutely wanted an excuse to buy some off my wishlist. I’ve covered my bases with adult fantasy books; Practical Magic by Alice HoffmanA Secret History of Witches by Louisa MorganThe Witches of Cambridge by Menna van Praag and The Witches Daughter by Paula Brackston. A couple young adult; Perfectly Preventable Deaths by Deirdre Sullivan (I met her at the Edinburgh Lit Festival and really loved her talk about the book) and Undead Girl Gang by Lily Anderson. And even a historical reimagining with Her Kind by Niamh Boyce*.


Honourable mentions of books about witches that I’ve read and enjoyed: Maresi by Maria Turtschaninoff (my review here), Sanctuary by V.V. James(my review here) and Equal Rites by Terry Pratchett.



2. Read a book with black on the cover!
When I picked this challenge I didn’t realise that pretty much every book has black on the cover! So I scanned my shelves for books that were almost all black on the cover. These are the ones that stick out and gave me a halloween vibe! Again I’ve got some young adult books; The Return by Jennifer L. Armentrout* and Once & Future by Amy Rose Capetta and Cori McCarthy. As well as some adult: The Last Namsara by Kristen Ciccarelli*, Fallible Justice by Laura Laakso, Murder by the Minister by Helen Cox* and The Craftsman by Sharon J. Bolton*. All suitably spooky in my opinion!

3. Read two books!
I always add some shorter books to my TBR for readathons because I’m not a particularly quick reader and two book in two days, especially weekdays, is a lot! I apparently read a lot of witch books as a kid and I’m very tempted to re-read some of my old favourites! So I have a separate pile of these like; Witch Child by Celia Rees, Gobbolino the Witch’s Cat by Ursula Moray Williams and Which Witch? by Eva Ibbotson.

What will you be reading this Halloween?
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Books I took to Copenhagen!

Copenhagen wasn’t really my kind of city. There wasn’t a lot of places to eat if you don’t eat meat and fish, and I didn’t end up finding much to do while I was there. On the other hand, the city was really beautiful and I actually managed to take a reasonable amount of books for once! So what did I pack…

Fighting Proud by Stephen Bourne
In this astonishing new history of wartime Britain, historian Stephen Bourne unearths the fascinating stories of the gay men who served in the armed forces and at home, and brings to light the great unheralded contribution they made to the war effort. Fighting Proud weaves together the remarkable lives of these men, from RAF hero Ian Gleed – a Flying Ace twice honoured for bravery by King George VI – to the infantry officers serving in the trenches on the Western Front in WWI – many of whom led the charges into machine-gun fire only to find themselves court-martialled after the war for indecent behaviour. 

I’ve talked about Fighting Proud a couple of times on my blog; when I bought it, its part in researching my Camp NaNo project and how I need to actually finish it after starting it on the plane. This is a really interesting read but I have to be in the right headspace for it because injustice can be exhausting. Probably not the best holiday read thinking about it!

Planetfall by Emma Newman*
Renata Ghali believed in Lee Suh-Mi’s vision of a world far beyond Earth, calling to humanity. A planet promising to reveal the truth about our place in the cosmos, untainted by overpopulation, pollution, and war. Ren believed in that vision enough to give up everything to follow Suh-Mi into the unknown.
More than twenty-two years have passed since Ren and the rest of the faithful braved the starry abyss and established a colony at the base of an enigmatic alien structure where Suh-Mi has since resided, alone. All that time, Ren has worked hard as the colony’s 3-D printer engineer, creating the tools necessary for human survival in an alien environment, and harboring a devastating secret.
Ren continues to perpetuate the lie forming the foundation of the colony for the good of her fellow colonists, despite the personal cost. Then a stranger appears, far too young to have been part of the first planetfall, a man who bears a remarkable resemblance to Suh-Mi.
The truth Ren has concealed since planetfall can no longer be hidden. And its revelation might tear the colony apart…
I was lucky enough to get my hands on Planetfall at the Gollancz event for book bloggers and boy, I was sold on these books almost immediately when Stevie talked a little about them. I started Planetfall while I was away and really enjoyed the diversity, the f/f relationships, and the world! I’ve since finished it and bought the next book in the series.

Déjà Dead by Kathy Reichs
Bagged and discarded, the dismembered body of a woman is discovered in the grounds of an abandoned monastery.
Dr Temperance Brennan, Director of Forensic Anthropology for the province of Quebec, has been researching recent disappearances in the city.
Soon she is convinced that a serial killer is at work. But when no one else seems to care, her anger forces her to take matters into her own hands. Her determined probing has placed those closest to her in mortal danger, however.
Can Tempe make her crucial breakthrough before the killer strikes again?

I bought this in Winter and haven’t picked it up yet. I just haven’t been in the mood for crime lately, it’s been a lot of YA being pulled off my shelves which is quite unusual for me. Although I so always take a crime book with me when I travel out of habit. They’re my version of a ‘beach read’!

Once & Future by Amy Rose Capetta and Cori McCarthy
A new King Arthur has risen and she’s got a universe to save.Coming to terms with your identity is always difficult. But for Ari, the 42nd reincarnation of King Arthur, it just got a whole lot more complicated. Gender-bending royalty, caustic wit and a galaxy-wide fight for peace and equality all collide in this epic adventure.
With an awkward adolescent Merlin and a rusty spaceship, this is the Arthurian legend as you have never before seen it.

Once & Future got a lot of hype when it first came out and now the dust has settled, I’m looking forward to seeing what I think of it. There have been some conflicting reviews! I was never big on the King Arthur legend but I love sci-fi and queer representation so hopefully I side with the hype-wagon.
You Asked for Perfect by Laura Silverman
Senior Ariel Stone has spent his life cultivating the perfect college résumé first chair violinist, dedicated volunteer, active synagogue congregant, and expected valedictorian. He barely has time to think about a social life, let alone a relationship… until a failed calculus quiz puts his future on the line, forcing Ariel to enlist his classmate, Amir, as a tutor.
As the two spend more time together, Ariel discovers he may not like calculus, but he does like Amir. When he’s with Amir, the crushing academic pressure fades away, and a fuller and brighter world comes into focus. But college deadlines are still looming. And adding a new relationship to his long list of commitments may just push Ariel past his limit.
This was the only book I started and finished while I was away and I really liked it. I’ll go into it more in my review but this is less of a m/m romance and more about the academic pressures teens put themselves under. It was relatable and heart-warming while also being quite an easy read.
Her Kind by Niamh Boyce*
A woman seeks refuge for herself and her daughter in the household of a childhood friend.
The friend, Alice Kytler, gives her former companion a new name, Petronelle, a job as a servant, and warns her to hide their old connection.
Before long Petronelle comes to understand that in the city pride, greed and envy are as dangerous as the wolves that prowl the savage countryside. And she realises that Alice’s household is no place of safety.
Once again, Petronelle decides to flee. But this time she confronts forces greater than she could ever have imagined and she finds herself fighting for more than her freedom…
Tense, moving and atmospheric, Her Kind is a vivid re-imagining of the events leading up to the Kilkenny Witch Trial.
There are so many amazing books about witches coming out this year and Her Kind is one of them, although, not about witches as much as history’s “witches”. Either way, I didn’t get around to this but I’m still so excited to read it. I can’t think of the last book I read set in Ireland!

Have you been to Copenhagen? Have you read any of these?
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The Non-Fiction Books I Need to Finish!

Non-fiction is a bit of an odd genre for me because I love documentaries and regularly start books about subjects I’m interested in, but I almost never finish non-fiction books. So I went hunting through my book piles and picked out the three I found the most interesting, and I’m going to try and finish them this Summer!



The True History of Chocolate by Sophie and Michael Coe*
Chocolate – ‘the food of the Gods’ – has had a long and eventful history. Its story is expertly told here by the doyen of Maya studies, Michael Coe, and his late wife, Sophie. The book begins 3,000 years ago in the Mexican jungles and goes on to draw on aspects of archaeology, botany and socio-economics. Used as currency and traded by the Aztecs, chocolate arrived in Europe via the conquistadors, and was soon a favourite drink with aristocrats. By the 19th century and industrialization, chocolate became a food for the masses – until its revival in our own time as a luxury item. Chocolate has also been giving up some of its secrets to modern neuroscientists, who have been investigating how flavour perception is mediated by the human brain. And, finally, the book closes with two contemporary accounts of how chocolate manufacturers have (or have not) been dealing with the ethical side of the industry.

Chocolate is a good chunk of the food I eat so when I started reading this during Lent after I gave up chocolate, this book felt a little like torture. I’ve spent hours wandering the chocolate museum in Köln and find the whole process fascinating so I’m looking forward to taking a really deep dive into it’s history, as well as the current market and ethics. What I’ve read so far is wonderfully written and ideal for reading with a cookie or five.

Please Take Me Home: The Story of the Rescue Cat by Clare Campbell
In Please Take Me Home, Clare Campbell takes us on a journey with the nation’s rescue cats, from being treated as pests throughout history to being the pet of choice today.
For a long time, stray cats in Britain were seen as a nuisance and hunted down as vermin. Having invited this wild, independent creature into our homes, humans did not extend their welcome for long. Over time, thousands of cats were subsequently abandoned and left to live on the margins of survival.
There were, however, the kind few who sought to help. But these good spirited people were often scorned, even derided as ‘mad’. A Princess of Wales was even told to stop helping lost cats in order to avoid a royal scandal; the story was kept a secret of state for years. It would take over a century for strays to become the beloved rescue cats of today, with some now gaining celebrity status, such as Downing Street’s Larry or Street Cat Bob.
Please Take Me Home is a fascinating and insightful history through the ages of the struggle for cats to exist in domesticity alongside mankind.


I began fostering cats in 2017 and since then, it’s become about 70% of my personality. I’ve literally had to stop writing this post three times because of kittens climbing onto my desk and standing on my keyboard (look at this silly boy). So I’m really interested in the history of the rescue cat and the people that began the charity work I do now! I have a feeling this is going to fill me with righteous indignation about the ten-and-a-half million cats estimated to be on the UKs streets, and how it’s all humans fault.

Fighting Proud by Stephen Bourne
In this astonishing new history of wartime Britain, historian Stephen Bourne unearths the fascinating stories of the gay men who served in the armed forces and at home, and brings to light the great unheralded contribution they made to the war effort. Fighting Proud weaves together the remarkable lives of these men, from RAF hero Ian Gleed – a Flying Ace twice honoured for bravery by King George VI – to the infantry officers serving in the trenches on the Western Front in WWI – many of whom led the charges into machine-gun fire only to find themselves court-martialled after the war for indecent behaviour. Behind the lines, Alan Turing’s work on breaking the ‘enigma machine’ and subsequent persecution contrasts with the many stories of love and courage in Blitzed-out London, with new wartime diaries and letters unearthed for the first time. Bourne tells the bitterly sad story of Ivor Novello, who wrote the WWI anthem `Keep the Home Fires Burning’, and the crucial work of Noel Coward – who was hated by Hitler for his work entertaining the troops. Fighting Proud also includes a wealth of long-suppressed wartime photography subsequently ignored by mainstream historians. This book is a monument to the bravery, sacrifice and honour shown by a persecuted minority, who contributed during Britain’s hour of need.

I actually got this for a story I was planning on writing for my creative writing module and needed to do some research about the gay men who served in WWII. Now it’s stemmed into the whole idea behind my Camp NaNoWriMo project so, unsurprisingly, it’s really good. My only issue is that I can get really sad reading some of the stories that don’t have the happiest endings so I have to take it in small chunks. It’s a really powerful and important book.

Have you read any of these? What are your favourite non-fiction books?
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My Holiday Season TBR!

I don’t tend to get a lot of reading done around the holiday season- it’s busy! There’s cleaning, cooking, decorating and general panicked shopping to be done while family is swarms the house. Plus, I’m a themed reader. I want my reads to have that vibe about how I generally feel about the holidays. I also don’t want anything to dark and heavy since SAD is in full effect these days. So these are the few books that pass the test…

I recently read And Then There Were None and now I really want to get to Murder at the Vicarage by Agatha Christie. I find that cosy crime is better for the colder months and more realistic crime are Summer holiday reads. Plus, I got this for Christmas last year so it’s about time I get to it!

From my 18 books I wanted to read in 2018 list, there are a few left that I’d like to get around to as the year winds down. I have Tess of the d’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy and Mansfield Park by Jane Austen in audiobook format which is super convenient for making cleaning/ decorating/ wrapping much less boring.

I also have my two non-fiction picks; Coming Out Under Fire by Allan Bérubé and Please Take Me Home: The Story of the Rescue Cat by Clare Campbell. I don’t think I’ll get both finished because I read non-fiction very slowly but I’ve started both and should be able to get a good chunk read. They’re fascinating!

And lastly, The Faber Book of Christmas is a gorgeous anthology I’ll probably dip in and out of for a Christmassy boost when I need it. I love having a collection that I can read bits from in the quiet moments of the festivities.

What will you be reading this Holiday Season?
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My Hallowreadathon 5 TBR!

It’s getting close to the best day of the year: Halloween! I still need to stock up on chocolate but considering we didn’t get any trick-or-treaters last year and I have an assignment due on the second day of my own dang readathon… it’s mostly for me. You can learn more about the Hallowreadathon and the challenges here, and here’s the pile of books I’ll be picking from!

So what are my choices for the challenges?


1. Read a book with a Magic World!
Beyond the Deepwoods by Paul Stewart & Chris Riddell was a big part of my childhood and I find the world so lovely and, dare I say, magical that I had to add it to the list.
I’m currently re-reading the Magisterium series and will hopefully be up to the fifth and final book: The Golden Tower by Holly Black & Cassandra Clare by Halloween!
Ink and Bone by Rachel Caine is an almost complete mystery to me beyond the fact that I really enjoy Rachel Caine, this is a fantasy series with a book/ library theme and it’s currently £1 on Amazon. I had to!

2. Read a book with Green on the cover!
Finding books with green on the cover is surprisingly hard! You’d think with grass, and trees, and just the fact that it’s the best colour (totally not bias) that there’d be a lot more green covers. But what did I manage to find?
A Christmas Return by Anne Perry* dropped through my letterbox and it has so many things going for it: it’s short, it’s very green and the readathon lasts until the day after Halloween = Christmas.
Bodacious: The Shepherd Cat by Suzanna Crampton* has to be on the list because not only is grass green, but this kitty has the prettiest green eyes! Curling up with whatever foster cat I’ll have at the time and reading about cats seems like spoopy goals.
Persuasion by Jane Austen is also on the list because I’m a huge audiobook fan and since the audiobook is 9 hours, I can totally do that in one day! Plus, I’ve been in a real Austen mood lately.

Are you joining the readathon? What are your picks for the challenges?
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5 Books I Want to Re-Read!

I’m not a re-reader. I was when I was a kid and it used to irritate everyone that I would read the same ten books on rotation. But now, I guess I’m just more aware that new books are coming out every week! So in the last four years of book blogging, I’ve re-read a bunch of books from my childhood but only five books have been read twice within that time. So I thought I’d make a list of the five books I want to re-read next!

Lolita by Vladamir Nabokov
I read Lolita in April of last year, it was even one of my favourite books of 2017, and I’ve had a review in my drafts since then. But I’ve never finished it, because along with reading a book this challenging is that a lot of my views were challenged- like how books can be about bad people and still be good books, and that a book with a ‘problematic’ main character can have value. So I’d like to re-read it, and think more about my opinions before I talk about them.
Plus, the language is beautiful and I want to experience Nabakovs mastery of the English language again.

Real Murders by Charlaine Harris
I really want to re-read the Aurora Teagarden series since I get desperately nostalgic for the world for days at a time. However, even though they’re short, 10 books is quite an undertaking! There’s a new Charlaine Harris book coming out in October (An Easy Death) but when I’m back in a Charlaine Harris drought, I’m going back to Lawrenceton, Georgia!

Empire by John Connolly and Jennifer Ridyard*
I bet if I collected up all the time I’ve spent talking about wanting to re-read this book on my blog, I could’ve actually re-read it! I loved Empire but I have that eternal fear of ending a series you love. I know, I know, I need to just bite the bullet. I’ve just invest in the audiobook so I’ll hopefully get to this soon!

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
As soon as I finished this, I wanted to start it again. Finishing up the review in February has only increased this need to read Catch-22 knowing exactly how the structure works and how everything is interwoven. Then, maybe, I’ll get to the less-liked sequel: Closing Time.

The Three by Sarah Lotz*
This was the first book since I started reading again that I lost myself in. I was completely taken in, to the point where I lost time and stayed up way too late to finish it. I don’t experience that very often and since it’s been four years since I read it, I’m hoping that I don’t remember enough to experience that again. I’ve read three other Sarah Lotz books since then and enjoyed them, but none have some close to The Three.

Are you a re-reader? What books are your favourite to re-read?
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18 Books I Want to Read in 2018: 180 Days Left!

I had to do some maths to figure out when there was 180 days left of 2018 and I’m still not completely convinced I’m right. But I love matching numbers so I tried. At the beginning of the year, I wrote a list of 18 books that were a priority for me this year and it seems like a good enough time for a check-in on how that’s going!



Starting with the ones I haven’t read (yet); Sense and SensibilityMansfield ParkNorthanger Abbey and Persuasion by Jane AustenI read Emma and Pride and Prejudice in 2017, and was in such an Austen mood at the beginning of the year. I started both Sense and Sensibility, and Mansfield Park but didn’t get very far at all though. 

Same with Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy. My audiobook listens have been more lighthearted lately but I’m not writing any of them off yet!

I’m actually really feeling like reading Empire and Dominion by Jennifer Ridyard and John Connolly as I write this, its so easy to forget about books with the constant flow of new releases but my YA craving will hopefully mean these are on my read shelf soon.

I can’t believe I didn’t read Coming Out Under Fire by Allan Bérubé during Pride month! I must get to this soon!

The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin and Never Greener by Ruth Jones are those kind of books that I picked up then put down again because I know in the future, I’ll be really in the mood for a specific type of story and they will be incredible reads.

I’m actually currently reading Please Take Me Home: The Story of the Rescue Cat by Clare Campbell on-and-off-again whenever I can get my current foster kittens to sit still long enough on my lap, but 8-week-olds very rarely sit still so I’m not very far in! I can already tell its going to break my heart though.

Despite now owning the Folio Society copy of the sequel, and the fact that I literally named three kittens I fostered in March after the characters- I didn’t re-read Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K Jerome while I had them! It’s a very Summer-y book though, so maybe this will distract me from this horrible heatwave we’re having.



And the ones I’ve read, like The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas AdamsI listened to the first book in May and continued with the second book in June so really I’m overachieving with this one. I did feel the pressure of hype with this one a little and it did have a bit of an effect on my enjoyment but these books are great and I’m glad I’ve finally started this series!

The Fear Within by J.S. Law was the first book on this list that I picked up but it took me a long time to finish! Despite loving the first book in this series; Tenacity (now called The Dark Beneath), it really was a bit of a letdown which you can read a bit more about here

I was a little let down by The Coffin Path by Katherine Clements too. Probably because I loved Katherine Clements debut; The Crimson Ribbon and her second book The Silvered Heart. But this one just wasn’t for me. I liked it, but I really wanted to love it.

I was dreading Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by JK Rowling when I added them to the list after having such an awful time with the fifth book, but these were both pleasant surprises and I had them ticked off by the middle of February. I don’t think I’ll re-read the Harry Potter series again for a long time though.



And the one I won’t be reading; Villette by Charlotte BrontëI started this and got a good way in but I really don’t like Charlotte Brontë’s writing so I’m giving myself a pass on this one. Maybe in a few years but I can’t see myself getting to it in the next 180 days.


What books do you want to read in the second half of 2018?
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