Books I Read in May & June!

As of the beginning of June, I handed in my last assignment for this year of university! So for May, I was working pretty hard on that, but I managed a surprising amount of reading done. Then once it was handed in, I really went wild! These are the books that have kept me company during a truly odd time in the world.

Undead and Unwed by MaryJanice Davidson
This is such a strange little book that Asha very kindly sent me! The main character is a meat-eating, leather-shoe loving PETA member, a Republican, so straight she could be a ruler, and a newly turned vampire. But don’t worry! She isn’t “Madame Slut” because she’s only slept with three people (at the beginning of the book anyway). My search for my new Sookie books continues but Betsy isn’t her, although I don’t regret my brief time with her.  She’s a very funny oddball.
“Did I tell you I throw up solid foods?”
“A fine party trick-“

Real Murders by Charlaine Harris
So, it’s been 6 years since I first read Real Murders! I really love this world and re-reading it felt like a hug from an old friend. I’ve been watching the Hallmark movies on Amazon Prime and Channel 5 so I knew the story pretty well, but I still had a blast.

Murder Most Unladylike by Robin Stevens
I was a huge Enid Blyton fan as a kid. I can still imagine the dormitories of St. Clares so vividly! So I was really excited when the wonderful Jemma sent this to me and couldn’t let it languish on my shelves for longer than a week. Overall, I really liked the Enid Blyton/ Agatha Christie mash-up vibes. It is exactly the kind of thing I would’ve loved to read as a kid (and still enjoyed as an adult).
Despite this being a literal murder mystery, I was still quite jarred by the repeated mention of suicide though. I didn’t expect it, I guess?

The Game Weavers by Rebecca Zahabi*
This is a debut that I’m going to write a full review on!

The Hunger Games, Catching Fire and Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins
These were a re-read for me and I loved them all the more as a 26 year old! I’ll be doing a full blog post talking about them so keep an eye out for that!

The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins
This was probably my most anticipated release of 2020 and I’m still a little unsure on where I land with it. I’m really glad that I’m not doing star-ratings for books this year because it would’ve been an impossible task. 
A lot of people were concerned that it was going to try and redeem Snow but I don’t think it does. It’s just the point of view of the bad guy doing bad things which I think is sometimes more interesting!

Jane by Aline Brosh McKenna and Ramón Pérez
I think something that helped me enjoy this more than the average person picking this up was the fact that I loathe Jane Eyre. So the fact that this modernised graphic novel adaptation didn’t stick to important aspects of the original novel; no orphanage, no plain main character, 200 pages of art instead of 500 pages of tiny words, didn’t bother me as much. But it also left no real impression. 

My Man Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse
Are these stories massively outdated, a little classist and almost identical plot-wise? Absolutely! Have these books been all I’ve wanted to listen to? Also yes. Essentially, Bertie gets into some kind of pickle, and Jeeves fixes it and earns himself some extra money. The perfect entertainment for a tired brain.

What have you been reading lately? Have you read any of these?

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2020: Mid-Year Freak Out Tag!

I can’t believe that it’s July. I don’t think there’s been such a weird year in my entire life. So when the lovely Anne from Rooting Branches tagged me in the Mid-Year Freak Out tag, it seemed like a good way to look back at the books I’ve been reading in 2020 and take stock before looking forward!

1: Best book you’ve read so far in 2020!
It maybe shows how 2020 is going, but it’s The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. It was just a really honest depiction of depression. I can see myself coming back to it over and over in the future.

2: Best sequel you’ve read so far in 2020!
I haven’t actually read many sequels so far this year. Although, Katherine Howard: The Tainted Queen by Alison Weir* is the fifth book in the Six Queens series and it was another great addition to the series. I do want to read more sequels, it’s really nice to get a new plot with all the world-building already done in your mind.

3: New release you haven’t read yet, but want to!
I’ve been pretty good at actually reading my pre-orders this year so I don’t have any unread at the moment. But, my copy of My Dark Vanessa by Kate Elizabeth Russell is currently in quarantine at Waterstones and I’m having to balance my want to read it with my fear of actually going to get it. Truly a 2020 problem!

4: Most anticipated release for the second half of the year!
I’m so keen to get my hands on Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas. The news of the publishing date push-back ruined my whole day when I found out. At least an October release date makes it perfectly timed for Halloween season!

5: Biggest disappointment!
Not an individual book, but more a feeling I’ve had when reading. It seems to be getting harder and harder to immerse myself in a book. Hopefully it’ll pass soon.

6: Biggest surprise!
I knew I was probably going to enjoy How to Hang a Witch by Adriana Mather but I didn’t think I’d love it so much! I didn’t know much going in and was expecting the usual fun YA that’s mainly action and romance, but it ended up being a really smart and impactful story about bullying.

Chilling Effect by Valerie Valdes

7: Favourite new author! (Debut or new to you)
Valerie Valdes’ debut, Chilling Effect* was an absolute romp of a space opera and I’m dying to get my hands on the sequel. Space cats!!!!

8: Newest fictional crush!
I’m not sure it counts because it’s more a I-want-you-in-my-life crush rather than romantic but I love Jeeves! I just finished My Man Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse and immediately moved on to The Inimitable Jeeves. They’re such fun books and I want Jeeves to fix all the problems in my life.

9: Newest favourite character!
Hazel from Murder Most Unladylike by Robin Stevens was a treasure. I really enjoyed the way that she wasn’t the leader of the detective society, so she got dragged into a lot of drama. I related to her a lot.

10: Book that made you cry!
I don’t really cry at books, I’m afraid! I did get a little choked up at Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins, but who didn’t?

11: Book that made you happy!
I don’t know about anyone else but it has been so stressful lately that almost no books have been making me happy. However, Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome will always pull a laugh from me.

12: Favourite book to film adaptation that you’ve seen this year!
I’m not sure I can claim this since I’ve never read the books, but the Netflix series Virgin River has been an absolute delight. I found myself wanting to read a romance which is not really my genre. Maybe I need to ease myself in with some paranormal romance and see how I get on.

A Messy Affair by Elizabeth Mundy

13: Favourite review you’ve written!
I’ve only written one full review this year- yikes! But I was very fond of A Messy Affair by Elizabeth Mundy* and really liked my review.

14: Most beautiful book you’ve bought (or received) this year!
I was blessed by the ARC angels and got my hands on an early copy of The Once and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow* and that cover? Every time I look at it, I swear I find something else I haven’t noticed before. Hopefully the book inside is just as beautiful.

15: What books do you need to read by the end of the year?
I don’t really need to read anything but I’m trying to keep up with all the books I’m purchasing… which is more than usual in lockdown! Top of my TBR is Wranglestone by Darren Charlton, Full Disclosure by Camryn Garrett and The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin!

That’s all folks! I think everyone and their mother has done this tag by now so if you haven’t, I tag you!

What books are you looking forward to in the tail end of 2020?

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Currently Reading #3

Cat rubbing agains Small Island by Andrea Levy

I’m bringing back an old post format from 2016 today, because I find myself reading too many books. I’m in a bit of a slump so I’ve been picking up a bunch of different things and not finishing them. So I’m hoping this’ll be a fun way to sort it out in my mind while being able to talk about some books with you all! Plus, check out what I was reading in #1 and #2! It’s the best kind of throwback.

Pile of books

Small Island by Andrea Levy
Recent events have made me want to pick this one up and I can’t remember if I read it as a kid, but it’s been on my shelves for years and years so it’s about time I revisit it. Small Island is set post-WWII from the point of views of two Jamaican immigrants and two white Brits. It looks at England’s past and it’s wonderful so far. I’m mostly listening to the audiobook read by Andrea Levy as it’s a really wonderful performance.

The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker
I read my first Pat Barker last year and it was one of my favourites of 2019! The Silence of the Girls is the Iliad from the point of view of the queen, Briseis. I’ll admit, I know next to nothing about the Iliad so it’s quite a learning curve. I’m tempted to borrow the audiobook from my library as it’s quite tough to get into.

Murder Most Unladylike by Robin Stevens
Every now and again I feel the need to dip into some Middle Grade and the lovely Jemma sent this to me just a couple weeks ago! I’ve been reading this exclusively this morning and I’m loving the Enid Blyton/ Agatha Christie mashup vibes. I wasn’t expecting the mentions of suicide though, and that’s a little jarring!

Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse
This was a recommendation from the wonderful Linda and I’m already eyeing up the sequel. It’s a fun mix of urban fantasy and speculative fiction- a monster hunter story set on a Native American reservation in the world of a climate apocalypse. I can’t wait for the main character and her new companion to fight some monsters- and maybe fall in love? Fingers crossed.

Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
This is the last Austen novel I have to read and I’ve hit a bit of a wall with it because they’re putting on a play and that is a plotline I can’t stand in any novel. I know it doesn’t last forever but I can’t bring myself to force through it at the moment. Maybe once I’ve finished some of these others!

My Man Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse
Sometimes I just need a bit of Wodehouse. And when I’m struggling to sleep in the midst of a global pandemic, that is his time to shine. These are short stories, half about Jeeves and Wooster and half about the character who was an early version of Wooster. And all are funny, sweet and almost identical in storyline so not hard to follow at all!

What are you reading at the moment? Have you read any of these?

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Books I Read in March and April!

It has been, unsurprisingly, a weird time over the past couple months. What with the pandemic and all, and my reading has been all over the place as a result. I’m not one of those people who have been devouring books as an escape, although I’m very jealous of them. Instead, I’ve been struggling to actually sit down and read without being incredibly aware of the fact that I’m reading and it being a struggle. So these are the books that I haven’t just thrown back onto my to-be-read pile within ten pages!

Pile of the books reviewed in post

Sweet and Deadly by Charlaine Harris
This is my favourites author debut and I didn’t love it. Charlaine Harris is my go-to. But it took her a couple go’s before she got the voice that I love so much now. It definitely makes me think I should give some other authors another try if I didn’t like their debut…

Atlas Alone by Emma Newman*
This was what I wanted from Ready Player One by Ernest Cline; immersive video games, post-nuclear apocalypse, real life consequences. It’s great! I read Planetfall last year and Atlas Alone really solidified how Emma Newman is one of those writers, like Charlaine Harris, where I seem to match with them. I just love their writing style so much that I will follow them anywhere.
I did have some weird feelings about the representation of asexuality in this one though. But I’m not asexual and that isn’t my place, so I went searching around and found some own-voices reviews. Please check them out for further detail; Sarah didn’t like the rep (spoilers in this one), Mairi did like the rep (spoiler-free).
“It’s the sense of total mental absorption that I love, the fading of my own noisy mind into the background with only the work filling the space.”

Chilling Effect by Valerie Valdes*
This is the first space opera style novel that I’ve enjoyed! I really want to like the sub-genre. I’ve tried many a different book in attempt but I’ve never found one that has done it for me. But space cats? I had to. So when I was sent this, it took me a couple of weeks to build the courage to pick it up. I’m going to do a full review on it and I am so looking forward to the sequel!  
“Favours are delicious,” Pink said. “I ask myself, ‘Dr. Jones, what do you want to eat for lunch?’ and favours are the first thing-“

Season of Migration to the North by Tayeb Salib
This is required reading for my last essay of my term at uni and I can’t say that I enjoyed reading it. However, it’s pretty interesting to read about. The author specifically chose to work with the stereotypes that both the West and the East have of Arab-Africans. So its the perfect book for an essay based on subverting readers expectations. It’s just a little unfortunate that it didn’t subvert my expectations that I wouldn’t have fun reading it. Post-modernist texts are not my favourite.

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
Stress has been making it hard for me to focus and enjoy reading, as weird as that may seem in a wrap-up of seven books. But it has, at times, felt like a bit of a chore. So I listened to the audiobook of The Bell Jar on a weird hunch and yeah, Plath describes the exact feeling. I loved this completely. And want to re-read it and do a full review on how much it meant for me in these weird times.
“The letters grew barbs and rams’ horns. I watched them separate, each from the other, and jiggle up and down in a silly way.”

The Book of Forgotten Authors by Christopher Fowler*
I have a full review of this one coming soon! 

Lady Susan by Jane Austen
This may be a controversial opinion, because when I asked the question: what Jane Austen should I start with? Nobody said Lady Susan. But over the past couple years I’ve read Emma, Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility and Northanger Abbey in one month, and Persuasion. So I feel pretty confident in saying- Lady Susan is a good starter Austen.
It’s an epistolary novel, so told in letters. And it’s about a truly awful society woman who is trying to get her daughter, and herself, married again. At less than 100 pages you get a real glimpse into Austen’s style without the pressure of staring down 500 pages of prose.
-for the pleasure of learning that the danger is over, is perhaps dearly purchased by all that you have previously suffered.”

What books have you been reading lately? What do you think of my new blog design? (please bear with me as I get my footing)

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Books I Read during my Scribd Free Trial!

Scribd is a digital library subscription service, a little like Netflix for books. It claims unlimited and what that actually means that if you read/listen to a lot, your access to certain options is limited until your next month. It also means unlimited within the collection they have, which is quite a bit, but not everything. You also get Mubi, the curated movie subscription service and FarFaria, a kids book service included. And it does a free 30 day trial. So I gave it a go and thought it’d be fun to go over what I read while trying out the service.



A Boy Worth Knowing by Jennifer Cosgrove
This has been on my wish list since I read Autoboyography a year ago and desperately searched for something similar. M/M romance? In high school? With GHOSTS? All a thumbs up from me so I was really excited to see this on Scribd in eBook form.

As for the book? The internal monologue could’ve done with some editing, I read it very fast so I picked up on a lot of little repetitive phrases, but the realism of a teenager telling themselves off inside their head was on point. I loved boys showing emotions, the importance of explicit consent, and as someone who spent a lot of my school time worrying about my attendance, I really loved the aunt encouraging taking a mental health day.

It was a sweet, fluffy, slightly paranormal romance and I would’ve loved it if it wasn’t for: “-I wouldn’t risk that. Not on the word of a junkie ghost.” That was just incredibly disappointing to read, I really hate that term for one, and for another this was a complete throwaway line and the drug abuse of the character was more a plot point to get to his death.

You by Caroline Kepnes

This was one of those rare occasions when the adaptation was as good/ better. I’ve never felt the need to read this after marathoning the show in one day last Boxing Day while completely ignoring my family, but I saw the audiobook and decided to listen to it. The narrator is incredibly good, similar in tone to Penn Badgley who plays Joe in the show, and creepy. I haven’t been so spooked by an audiobook since I listened to It.

I like a unreliable narrator but it can wear after a while because Joe felt frantic for the entire book. I found myself feeling physically stressed so I probably won’t read the sequel but I loved season 2 of You. I think maybe reading this physically might calm the pace.

Small Kingdoms & Other Stories by Charlaine Harris
I was really excited going into this as it was a short story collection of an interesting new character (at least for me) from Charlaine Harris. A high school principal with a shady past? Totally different from what I’ve read from Harris before and I loved it. The stories were short enough that I could get through one while I was winding down for bed and long enough that I really got a feel for the world and a satisfying story-arc.

Plus, Harris’s writing just works for me. Physical or audio, novel or short story (my least favourite format), I love her style and this was no exception.

After Dead by Charlaine Harris
This is the exception, however. I get that she did this ‘for the fans’ who wanted to know what came next but I am so glad I never bought this. The audiobook for this is 47 minutes. For comparison, the first Sookie Stackhouse book is nine and a half hours. And I know it’s not a novel but that is shockingly short.

This should’ve been published online for free, like Charlaine Harris has mentioned that she wanted to, not have the RRP of £8.99. Or it would’ve been a great blog tour! Think about fifty-ish blogs all posting one characters future and keen readers popping around, finding blogs they love that have the same taste as them! Although I’d feel sorry for whoever got the character who ‘contracted ghonnorea’ and that’s it!? This is both a missed opportunity and a disappointing cash grab.

This is tough to really review because I enjoyed the novella and some of the interviews, skipped the timeline for the books because I’m currently re-reading them, and found the fan club section a little weird. I don’t think this is by any means necessary reading, but I could see that it had, at least, more content than After Dead.

And finally a full novel. I dived back into Harris with my heart open and this paid off. This is her second novel and a standalone so I was blown away by how many things changed and how many stayed the same when it came to her characters and her story structure, still the same old Southern charm I loved but a bit less detective-y than I expected. I prefer it when the main character has a big impact on how the case is resolved, but this would’ve ended up the same way without her input.

I will say though, for something written 36 years ago in 1984? This was surprisingly progressive about rape culture! So overall, it was okay but not something I’m clamouring to read again.

If you want two free months, here’s a link! Or if you don’t want to give them your card details, here’s one month free!

Have you read any of these? Are you a Scribd subscriber?

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Audiobooks to Listen to while Playing Animal Crossing!

Animal Crossing came out yesterday and I am so so so glad. And I love listening to audiobooks while I play Animal Crossing. There is nothing better than watering your flowers, fishing and bug catching with a gentle story being told in the background. I tend to go for more relaxed audiobooks, nothing too complicated or full of action that might ruin the Animal Crossing ~vibes~ for me. So here are my recommendations, and a few I plan to listen to!



If you have a pig villager, or a hankering for pastoral mischief, look no further than The Blandings Castle series by P.G. Wodehouse. I cannot recommend a series more for listening while playing Animal Crossing because the stakes are very very low and every book follows a similar plotline of someone impersonating someone else and something nefarious to do with the pig. I’ve read eight or nine of these now and they’re always read by very posh older gentlemen in very soothing tones.

If your luck ran out and your island is full of smug and snooty villagers, then I think you can’t go wrong with a Jane Austen. Personally, I think Emma is a great pick if you’re surrounded by gossips, and the new movie is out this year.

If you’re in the Northern Hemisphere and are taken by the Spring vibes and the sound of water, Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome is the story of, you guessed it, three men (and a dog) in a boat taking a holiday down the river Thames. I just listened to this in February and recommend both unabridged and abridged (which is on Spotify, read by Hugh Laurie).

If you feel like leaning into the oddity of being the only humanoid on an island of talking animals, look to further than the Discworld books by Terry Pratchett. I really recommend the witches branch of this series, starting with Equal Rites, but Lianne has a great video breaking down the vast universe and all the best starting points. Oddball characters, magic, fantasy lands, I didn’t really like the first book which I read physically but they shine in audiobook format.

Personally, I just started Lady Susan by Jane Austen but it’s pretty short and two and a half hours is nothing when it comes to Animal Crossing. I’m really tempted to go back and listen to the Sookie Stackhouse books by Charlaine Harris on audiobook as I’ve been slowly re-reading them since I finished my first read of my favourite waitresses tales.

If you are looking to load up on audiobooks, consider Libro.fm as they’re currently doing a deal where you get two books for the price of one and all the money goes to your local bookstore! Or you can get a free book using my link. Libro is a great alternative to Audible!

And what will I be listening to?
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Books I Read in February!

Despite taking part in Februwitchy this month, I actually didn’t read as many witchy books as I planned. Although I loved having a themed TBR and finally getting to some of the books I’ve been meaning to read for a long time. I need to figure out a way to implement that in future!

The Witches of Cambridge by Menna Van Praag
This isn’t the style of book I normally read. As I mentioned in my Februwitchy TBR, I want to read more romance but this just wasn’t it for me. There were a lot of characters all having different dramas that were all very domestic and uninteresting to me personally, I couldn’t get a handle on one character and her cheating husband before I was whisked away to her mother and her grief, then her sister and her fertility struggles.
Witchcraft was rarely used apart from a couple times and always seemed to take away peoples consent. I liked the focus on kitchen witchery but not how it was used. I can imagine why people would like this but in the end, it just wasn’t my cup of tea.

Half-Blood by Jennifer L. Armentrout
I always know I can turn to Armentrout when I want the same vibes as the Twilight-era, and she’s a prolific writer with various series so when I wanted something new, I picked up Half-Blood because modern day descendants of Greek gods? Sure! However, with the fun 2000s romp vibes, comes all the body-shaming and slut-shaming so common in those books. A truly mysterious phenomena!
I can’t speak for if the demonising of addiction was deliberate or just part of the unfortunate cultural opinion but that was something that really stood out to me in Half-Blood. Literally, the daimons (pronounced like demon) are addicted to the life force of these children of gods and are described as “like a druggie going after her fix” and they “sounded high”. Wild.
Its a shame because it’s a fun read! And openly queer-positive. But I won’t continue the series, I think when I’m next in the mood for an Armentrout, I’ll go back to the Lux series that I’ve loved in the past (my review of the first book, Obsidian is here).


Pigs Have Wings by P.G. Wodehouse
These books are like the perfectly crafted tiny cake that you just eat, enjoy, and don’t have to dissect or think about too much. If you want a simple tale of the upper class English stealing pigs and having various visitors that aren’t who they present themselves as, this is the series for you! The perfect audiobook to listen to when insomnia hits.

How to Hang a Witch by Adriana Mather
This was a birthday gift from the lovely Mols and it is truly one of my favourite books of the year, and it’s only February! Full review coming!

Tender is the Flesh by Agustina Bazterrica
This was released in English in February and when I wrote about 2020 releases I was most excited for, this was top of the list in my mind. This took me in places I didn’t expect and couldn’t wrap-up in a paragraph or two, so I’ll be doing a full post!

Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K Jerome
I actually listened to the unabridged and the abridged audiobooks of Three Men in a Boat this month. I grew up listening to the Hugh Laurie edition but wanted to read the full book- boy, I was not expecting a dead dang body!
Even so, this book is truly one of my favourites, I’ve named kittens after the characters in the past. I don’t think you can go wrong with this if you need light-hearted fun and charming 1800’s travels down the Thames. One day I’ll write an ode to this book but I’ve remembered how much I love it and will definitely be re-reading it again (and again (and again)).

What did you read in February? Have you read any of these?
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2020: The Year of No Star-Ratings

Hindsight is 20/20 as they always say, and let me tell you, I’ve been trying to figure out how to turn that into some kind of personal challenge for 2020 for ages. In the end, the answer was easy and the eagle-eyed among you might have noticed in my January reading wrap-up… I don’t want to give star-ratings for books for a full year and see how it changes my reading and blogging.

There are a couple of reasons why I want to do this:

1. For the past few years, star ratings have gotten harder and harder to give. I’ll finish a book and be overthinking about if I should rate a book three or four, did I like it as much as X which I gave four stars, but it didn’t teach me anything like Y which I gave three. What was originally an impulse decision based on how much I enjoyed a book has become overly-complicated.

2. I’m trying to be less negative. I started book blogging to boost books I loved and lately I feel like I’ve become a real grump. I’ve become too critical to the point where I’m not enjoying reading as much because my brain is too busy thinking about star-ratings and reviews. Maybe it’s the English Literature degree, but I need to re-evaluate a lot of things in 2020 and I think taking away this small thing will help with that.

3. My average star rating in 2019 was three stars. That’s terrible. And I read some good books in 2020! I want to focus more on the books and less on the numbers, so I hope this will help! I’ve always liked star ratings, I’ve never understood why some people don’t use them, but they’ve stopped working for me and I’m ready to try something new.

The only time I’m going to rate a book is if it belongs on my six-star shelf and I know it in my bones. If a book changes my life, my sheets and cleans the litter box, it’ll get this rating.

What do you think of star ratings? Do you use them all the time?
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Books I Read in January!

After a rough 2019, I was ready for a good January and the stack of books by my bed that I really wanted to read. I ended up reading four books; one short story, a play and two 2020-release novels. The old seasonal depression caught me at the end of the month but I can actually say I enjoyed everything I read in January!

The Embassy of Cambodia by Zadie Smith
I always like to start the year with a short book that I think I can learn from so I can go in with a new perspective. The Embassy of Cambodia was perfect for that. It’s focus was on modern-day slavery which isn’t something I’ve ever read a book about.
It’s a short story, which I normally shy away from because I find they can feel quite unbalanced, but it felt complete and easy to read even while dealing with a serious topic. The characters were quickly formed and felt real, which makes the plot all the more affecting.
This was also my first Zadie Smith and I’m definitely going to read more.
Waterstones | Amazon

The Playboy of the Western World by J. M. Synge
This is required reading for my current university module and it was a bit of a weird one because reading plays is such a different experience to other fiction. I think I’d enjoy it if I saw it performed. It’s a fun study for sure as it had a massive backlash from audiences at the time! I’m currently writing an essay on it so we’ll see if I still like it in 1500 words…
Waterstones | Amazon | Book Depository

A Messy Affair by Elizabeth Mundy*
You can read my full book review here!
Waterstones | Amazon | Book Depository

Six Tudor Queens: Katheryn Howard, The Tainted Queen by Alison Weir*
I’ve got a full review of this coming sooner the release date!
WaterstonesAmazon | Book Depository

Have you read any of these? What did you read in January?

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My Februwitchy TBR!

My wonderful friend Asha is hosting a month-long readathon; Februwitchy (you can read all about it here) and I, of course, needed to join. Mainly because I love witches but also because I bought a lot of witchy books for my Hallowreadathon, which Asha helped host, and never got around to reading them! I don’t normally do TBRs because I’m a huge mood reader but I think I’ve covered all my bases with this one…

If I feel like romance; The Witches of Cambridge by Menna Van Praag and Practical Magic by Alice Hoffman both blend magic with love. I’ve wanted to read more romance lately and I think these will help me dip my feet in with a familiar urban fantasy feel.

Both The Witch’s Daughter by Paula Brackston and The Secret History of Witches by Louisa Morgan are a blend of historical fiction and romance ending up in modern day (from what I can gather from blurbs) and if you search for witch-y books, I guarantee any list will include both of these so I want to get into at least one of these chunks.

If I feel like a historical fiction book that is more on the side of history, Her Kind by Niamh Boyce* is about the 14th century Kilkenny witch trials in Ireland. I don’t think I’ve read much of this time period before so I’m looking forward to learning more about it.

Hex Life, edited by Christopher Golden and Rachel Autumn Deering was a Secret Santa gift from Kate and I think it’s going to be the star of this readathon for me because if I can just read one of the eighteen stories every day, then I’ll finish this in no time. I love discovering new authors as well so this might end up making my TBR longer…

And if I feel like YA, I’ve got How to Hang a Witch by Adriana Mather, a birthday present from the wonderful Mols. Naondel and Maresi: Red Mantle by Maria Turtshaninoff which have been intimidating me ever since I read the first incredible book in this series, so I need the readathon themed push! And Perfectly Preventable Deaths by Deirdre Sullivan was a book I bought last year because I was seeing Maria and Deirdre at the Edinburgh Book Festival but never dived into it. For shame!

What are you reading in February? Anything witch-y?
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